The Full Works Concert: Thursday 5 March 2015, 8pm

The San Francisco Symphony – under the baton of Michael Tilson Thomas – is the featured orchestra on tonight’s Full Works Concert in the Great Orchestras of the World series.

Tonight Catherine Bott showcases the brilliant San Francisco Symphony Orchestra – another of our Great Orchestras of the World.

Founded in 1911, the Orchestra is an integral part of the city's life and culture. As early as 1925, they were making pioneering recordings and radio broadcasts, which saved the fledgling orchestra from imminent bankruptcy. During the Great Depression, when its existence was threatened by bankruptcy and the 1934–35 season was cancelled, the people of San Francisco passed a bond measure to provide public financing and ensure the organization's continued existence.

Since 1995, Michael Tilson Thomas has been the Orchestra's music director, after guest conducting with them as far back as 1974. He has ensured that the orchestra has played more American music and this has been carried through to its recordings. He has also focused on Russian music, particularly Stravinsky, as well as recording a superb Mahler cycle. Michael Tilson Thomas excels at reaching out to audiences to enhance their experience of music through education.

Tonight’s concert features Mahler’s monumental Symphony No.1 and Gershwin’s Piano Concerto.


Ludwig van Beethoven: Leonore Overture No.3
Michael Tilson Thomas conducts the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra

George Gershwin: Piano Concerto in F major
Piano: Garrick Ohlsson
Michael Tilson Thomas conducts the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra

Gustav Mahler: Symphony No.1 in D major, ‘Titan’
Michael Tilson Thomas conducts the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra

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