Classical music improves children's social skills

Listening to classical music at an early age has a wide-range of educational benefits, including improving concentration, self-discipline, listening, and social skills, according to a study.

Child and violin

Pupils aged between seven and ten at 26 primary schools in London were introduced to a range of different composers and instruments, as well as being taught about musical concepts. Teachers noted an improvement in the children's ability to listen, alongside increased concentration levels, self-discipline, and social skills.

The study, carried out by the University of London’s Institute of Education, also found children were more likely to appreciate a wider range of music in later life after being given an early grounding in classical music.

Speaking to The Telegraph, researcher Susan Hallam, professor of education and music psychology, said: “We know that preferences for music are affected by the extent to which individuals are exposed to them, the greater the exposure the greater the liking."

"Opportunities to listen extensively to classical music in the early years of primary school are therefore likely to lead to children appreciating a wider range of music than might otherwise be the case."