Classical music's tempo markings, as described by baby goats

29 April 2015, 21:39

Confused about those crazy tempo markings in that piece you're learning? Don't worry, we've got dozens of super-cute baby goats to help

Lento

(Italian: 'slow') The music is to be played at a slow pace.

Molto Lento

(Italian: 'very slow') To be played at a very slow pace

 

Adagio

(Italian: 'slowly')  At a slow speed, but more lighthearted than adagio

Adagietto

(Italian: 'slightly slowly')  At a slow speed, but more lighthearted than adagio

Andantino

(Italian: 'walking') Slightly slower than a walking pace

Andante

(Italian: 'walking'). Meaning the music should be played at a walking pace. Not too fast or slow.



Allegro

(Italian: 'lively'). The music should be played cheerfully, upbeat and brisk.

Affrettando    

(Italian: 'becoming hurried') Increasing in speed

 

Presto

(Italian: 'quick') An instruction that a movement, section, or work is fast in tempo.

Prestissimo

(Italian: 'very quick') Very very fast pace

Accelerando

(Italian: 'getting faster') The pace of the passage increases gradually

 

Rallentando

(Italian: 'getting slower') The pace of the passage decreases gradually

Vivacissimo

(Italian: 'very vivacious') Very fast and lively

Allegro con moto

Presto - Prestissimo - Rallentando - Andante

 

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