Camille Saint-Saëns: Danse Macabre

Just like a philosopher, a composer usually, at some point, tackles the big philosophical issues in his music. Find out more about Saint-Saëns's Danse Macabre, theme to TV's Jonathan Creek. Watch and listen to different recordings and download your favourite.

Camille Saint-Saëns: Danse Macabre

Death is up there on most composers’ radars as a worthy inspiration. Saint-Saëns happened on the subject in the early 1870s, originally setting to music a strange, art-house poem by Henri Cazalis, which has the first line ‘Zig, zig, zig, death in cadence’. Originally it was for voice and piano but, thankfully, Saint-Saëns reworked it a couple of years later, substituting a violin for the voice and adding the full orchestra. When it was premiered at one of the Parisian Châtelet concerts (these took place in the Théâtre du Châtelet) it was immediately encored in full. Since then, it has remained one of Saint-Saëns’s most popular pieces, with television providing endless opportunities to hear it again in theme tunes.

There’s a whole narrative that unfolds in the piece, with the violin representing death himself and the story starting at midnight – hence the twelve chiming opening notes. So it was completely appropriate that the piece was chosen to open the Bafta-winning mystery crime series, from 1997 to 2013. It starred Alan Davies as the magician’s assistant who solves apparently supernatural mysteries using his knowledge of trickery.

Recommended Recording

Orchestre de Paris; Daniel Barenboim (conductor). Deutsche Grammophon: DG 4158472.


L. Angelov & V. Eschkenazy

Saint-Saëns: Danse Macabre recordings

Saint-Saëns

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